What Was The Significance Of The Munich Agreement Of 1938

On his way back from Munich, Chamberlain told an excited crowd at Heston airport: “It is peace for our time” and he praised the agreement he had signed with Hitler. This was the culmination of the policy of appeasement. Six months later, Hitler stopped his promises and ordered his armies to invade Prague. Within a year, Britain and France were at war with Germany. In the end, did the British people want to go to war for the Sudetenland? His answer was “no”: and although there were certainly differences between Chamberlain and his colleagues, with the Foreign Office, which had no real hope that Hitler would be satisfied with a peaceful future, very few were willing to answer “yes” in 1938. The economic consequences of the Munich agreement will certainly be very severe for Czechoslovakia. The loss of industries, railwayheads, knots, etc., cannot help but cause a sharp loss of trade and unemployment. There is no doubt that Czechoslovakia becomes the object of quasi-colonial exploitation for Germany. On October 2, 1938, Chamberlain wrote in a letter to his sister Hilda: On September 29 and 30, 1938, an emergency meeting of the major European powers took place in Munich – without Czechoslovakia or the Soviet Union, allied with France and Czechoslovakia. An agreement was quickly reached on Hitler`s terms.

It was signed by the leaders of Germany, France, Great Britain and Italy. On the military front, the Sudetenland was of strategic importance to Czechoslovakia, as most of its border defences were there to protect themselves from a German attack. The agreement between the four powers was signed with low intensity in the context of an undeclared German-Czechoslovak war, which had begun on 17 September 1938. Meanwhile, after 23 September 1938, Poland transferred its military units to the common border with Czechoslovakia. [2] Czechoslovakia bowed to diplomatic pressure from France and Great Britain and decided on 30 September to cede Germany to Munich conditions. Fearing a possible loss of Zaolzie to Germany, Poland issued an ultimatum to Zaolzie, with a majority of Polish ethnic groups, which Germany had accepted in advance and accepted Czechoslovakia on 1 October. [3] 29 and 30 September 1938: Germany, Italy, Great Britain and France sign the Munich Agreement by which Czechoslovakia is to cede its border and defensive regions (the so-called Sudetenland) to Nazi Germany.

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